Products

Oxford Shoes

Oxfords (also referred as "Balmorals"): the vamp has a V-shaped slit to which the laces are attached; also known as "closed lacing". The word "Oxford" is sometimes used by American clothing companies to market shoes that are not Balmorals, such as Blüchers.

Boat Shoes

Boat shoes, also known as "deck shoes": similar to a loafer, but more casual. Laces are usually simple leather with no frills. Typically made of leather and featuring a soft white sole to avoid marring or scratching a boat deck. The first boat shoe was invented in 1935 by Paul Sperry.

Panny Lofar shoe

Slip-ons are typically low, lace-less shoes. The style most commonly seen, known as a loafer in American culture, has a moccasin construction. First appearing in the mid-1930s from Norway, they began as casual shoes, but have increased in popularity to point of being worn in America with city lounge suits, though these still require lace-up shoes in more conservative locations such as Britain[citation needed]. They are worn in many situations in a wide variety of colours and designs, often featuring tassels on the front, or metal decorations (the 'Gucci' loafer).


Brogue shoe

Brogues (American: wing-tips): The toe of the shoe is covered with a perforated panel, the wing-tip, which extends down either side of the shoe. Brogues can be found in both balmoral and blucher styles, but are considered slightly less formal.

Derby Shoe

A Derby or Gibson (also called a Blücher, or erroneously an Oxford in the United States) is a style of shoe characterized by shoelace eyelet tabs that are sewn on top of the vamp, a construction method that is also sometimes referred to as "open lacing" where the tongue cut in one piece with the forepart. Oxfords (or bal-type), in contrast to blücher, are characterized by shoelace eyelet tabs that are stitched underneath the vamp. The Blucher design is named after Prussian general Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher, one of Napoleon's more formidable opponents who decided his troops needed better shoes and commissioned a boot with side pieces lapped over the front. This design was adopted by armies across Europe, became a trendy sporting and hunting shoe in the 1850s, and then became appropriate for town affairs in the turn of the century.[1] The Blücher is a step down in dressiness from the oxford.

Monks Shoes

A monk shoe is a style of shoe with no lacing, closed by a buckle and strap.
It is moderately formal shoe: less formal than a full Oxford (American: Balmoral); but more so than an open Derby (American: Blücher). In between these, it is one of the main categories of men's shoes

Venetian Style Shoe

Venetian style shoes (venetian-style loafers) are mid-heel slippers with an upper or top part that is slightly open to the kick of the foot and the ankle bone [1]. The slipper is comparable to the profile and style of a Venetian bark ("Vénitienne") (OQLF). The venetian style shoe and its lack of ornamentation contrasts with the loafer which may have slotted straps, vamps and even tassels. The term came from Great Britain [1].

Winklepickers Shoe

Winklepickers (also known as Winkle Pickers) are a style of shoe or boot worn from the 1950s onward by male and female British rock and roll fans. The feature which gives both the boot and shoe their name is the very sharp and quite long pointed toe, reminiscent of medieval footwear and approximately the same as the long pointed toes on some women's high fashion shoes and boots in the late 2000s. The pointed toe was called the winkle picker toe because in England periwinkle snails or winkles are or were a popular seaside snack, which is eaten using a pin or other pointed object to carefully extract the soft parts out of the coiled shell, hence the phrase: "to winkle something out", and from that, winkle-pickers as a humorous name for shoes with a very pointed tip.


Women Shoes:

Ballet Flate

Ballet flats are derived from a woman's soft ballet slipper, with a very thin heel or the appearance of no heel at all. The style usually features a ribbon-like binding around the low tops of the slipper and may have a slight gathering at the top-front of the vamp (toe box) and a tiny, decorative string tie. Ballet slippers can be adjusted and tightened to the wearer's foot by means of this string tie.

Court Shoe

Court shoes for women are usually heeled. The heel and toe can be any shape as dictated by the fashion of the time. In the UK, in 2007 a closed toe and wide (non-stiletto) heel were worn by the very fashion conscious, but most still wore stilettos of mainly 'kitten' height to medium height. Outside the fashion trade in the UK, the term "pumps" would normally imply flat or low heel dancing or ballerina pumps, or even rubber soled canvas plimsolls.

Lofar shoe

Slip-ons are typically low, lace-less shoes. The style most commonly seen, known as a loafer in American culture, has a moccasin construction. First appearing in the mid-1930s from Norway, they began as casual shoes, but have increased in popularity to point of being worn in America with city lounge suits, though these still require lace-up shoes in more conservative locations such as Britain[citation needed]. They are worn in many situations in a wide variety of colours and designs, often featuring tassels on the front, or metal decorations (the 'Gucci' loafer).

Sling Backs

A slingback is a type of woman's shoe that is backless and is characterized by a strap that crosses behind the heel or ankle. A slingback is distinguishable from an ankle-strap shoe in that the latter has a strap that crosses around the front of the ankle as well as the back.

Mules

Mule, a French word, is a style of shoe that is backless and often closed-toed. Mules can be any heel height - from flat to high. The style is predominantly (but not exclusively) worn by women.

Mary Janes

Mary Jane is an American term (formerly trademarked) for a kind of strap shoe or sandal that typically has low heels, broad and rounded closed toes, and a single-buckle strap across the instep and/or around the ankle. They are traditionally made of black patent leather, although some current incarnations can be in a wide array of colors and leathers.

Mojari

Mojari is a generic name of handcrafted ethnic footwear produced in India and Pakistan. These are made by artisans mostly using vegetable tanned leather. The uppers are made of one piece of leather or textile embroidered and embellished with brass nails, cowries shells, mirrors, bells and ceramic beads. Even the bonding from the upper to the sole is done by cotton thread that is not only eco-friendly but also enmeshes the leather fibers with great strength. Some product range also uses bright and ornate threads.


Saddle

The Saddle shoe is a low-heeled, oxford, casual shoe characterized by a plain toe and distinctive, saddle-shaped decorative panel placed mid foot. Saddle shoes are typically constructed of leather and are most frequently white with a black saddle, although any color combination is possible.[citation needed]
Saddle shoes are worn by both men and women in a variety of styles ranging from ultra high platforms to golf cleats.

Venetian Style

Venetian style shoes (venetian-style loafers) are mid-heel slippers with an upper or top part that is slightly open to the kick of the foot and the ankle bone [1]. The slipper is comparable to the profile and style of a Venetian bark ("Vénitienne") (OQLF). The venetian style shoe and its lack of ornamentation contrasts with the loafer which may have slotted straps, vamps and even tassels. The term came from Great Britain [1].

Winkle Picker

Winklepicker shoes, inspired by the Poulaines worn by the medieval French nobility,[1] were a conspicuous contrast to the brothel creepers worn by Teddy Boys. The male shoes were lace-up Oxford style with a low heel and an exaggerated pointed toe. A Chelsea Boot style (elastic-sided with a two-inch, and later as much as two and one half inch, Cuban heel ) was notably worn by the Beatles, but although it had a pointed toe, was not considered to be a Winklepicker. Winklepicker shoes from Stan's of Battersea were also worn by the Teddy Girls as well as being a fleeting fashion for young women generally.